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Sunday Salon: A couple of books and another blanket

November 16, 2008

The Sunday Salon.comThings have been pretty quiet around here this week. I’ve finished and reviewed three books in the past week: The Hero of Ages by Brandon Sanderson, Fables, Vol. 8: Wolves by Bill Willingham, and A Breath of Snow and Ashes by Diana Gabaldon.

I think I’m teetering on the hairy edge of being sick; I spent yesterday afternoon and evening alternating between reading and falling asleep over my reading, despite getting 8+ hours the night before. Luckily, there’s nothing too taxing on my plate for today: lots of water, a little ironing, a little reading (probably going to start The Book of Lost Things by John Connolly, as per my poll results), a little movie-watching (probably while I do the ironing), and reviews to write for the book I finished yesterday (Spook by Mary Roach) and the one I finished this morning (Fables, Vol. 9: Sons of Empire by Bill Willingham).

One thing I did accomplish this week was finishing another blanket. I’ve been working on it on and off since March, but at least I finished it before we got any real snow, which was my goal. (And yes, I know snowflakes are supposed to have six sides, not eight. So it goes.) Crocheting a blanket was kind of nice, since the individual squares were a lot more portable than half a blanket on giant circular knitting needles, but I’m ready to go back to knitting, now.

snowflakeblanket

My blanket’s a modification of the “Snowfleck Throw” pattern in Heirloom Afghans to Knit and Crochet by Jean Leinhauser and Rita Weiss. The original pattern is all one color, 6×8 squares (mine’s 7×9), and I didn’t do the last round of the border, since it was already getting a little too frilly for my tastes.

23 Comments leave one →
  1. November 16, 2008 1:08 pm

    The blanket is beautiful! And I personally think your snow flakes can have as many sides as you want! :-)

    I do hope you aren’t coming down with anything. And if you are, hopefully it’ll pass quickly and not be too much of an annoyance.

    Have a great week.

  2. November 16, 2008 2:10 pm

    The blanket looks great! I find that crocheted squares definitely help with project portability, but I tend to end up with tons of them scattered around everywhere because joining them isn’t nearly as much fun as making them. :)

  3. November 16, 2008 2:26 pm

    Your blanket is gorgeous. I’m impressed!

  4. November 16, 2008 3:09 pm

    Love the blanket! So pretty!

    I look forward to those reviews :)

  5. November 16, 2008 5:19 pm

    That’s a beautiful blanket! The one and only afghan I’ve crocheted was one that was made of blocks too; it’s so much easier to keep track of if you only have time to work in short bursts. I count finishing that blanket as one of my biggest accomplishments to date :)

  6. November 16, 2008 6:13 pm

    Wow…your blanket is beautiful! I can barely sew on buttons.

  7. November 16, 2008 6:27 pm

    Wow, your snowflake blanket is just gorgeous! I find crocheting afghan squares very relaxing, as for knitting I have no talent though I wish I did.

    I’m really looking forward to reading your Fables reviews – I’m not looking till I catch up though lol!

  8. November 16, 2008 7:59 pm

    Literary Feline – Heh… The laws of physics can take a leap – I’m keeping my 8-sided snowflakes!

    Memory – I did have to sit down last weekend, put on my audiobook, and just join squares for several hours. Bleh.

    bermudaonion – Thanks!

    Nymeth – We’ll see how coherent they are… one of the symptoms of my quasi-sickness is a little bit of brain-jello and attendant rambliness.

    Kim – It’s true, working for an hour and producing a square is a lot more satisfying than working for an hour and producing three quarters of an inch of knitted blanket.

    softdrink – Who said anything about buttons? If it requires actual needles, I’m straight out.

    Joanne – I’m doing my best not to be too spoiler-y, but I still totally understand not reading other reviews before you read the book. I’ll be looking forward to your reviews as you catch up. :)

  9. November 16, 2008 8:32 pm

    I think I’m getting sick too. I’m sleeping a whole lot more and I just felt kind of icky today. That’s a pretty blanket!

  10. November 17, 2008 7:25 am

    I think I’m going to do my next blanket in crochet squares – yours is lovely!

    I’m with you on getting sick – tired all the time and I seem to have developed a constant headache. I think it’s just that time of year, unfortunately.

  11. November 17, 2008 10:02 am

    Jen – Blech! I prescribe lots of water, lots of sleep, and a good, fun, slightly fluffy book!

    Meghan – I do blame the time of year, since I think I’m currently in the throes of some late-arriving fall allergies. Hopefully your blechiness clears up soon too!

  12. November 17, 2008 3:03 pm

    Your beautiful blanket reminds me of the Afghan jewelry show here in the Asian Art Museum. Some of the pieces demonstrate the similar motifs.

    The Book of Lost Things is in my TBR pile so I’ll check back for your opinions. Take care of yourself. :)

  13. November 17, 2008 8:52 pm

    Nicki – You’re a woman of many talents!

    I hope you’re staying well.

  14. November 18, 2008 11:29 am

    Matthew – I never really thought about it before, but maybe it’s not surprising that my afghan pattern resembles an Afghan pattern. :)

    Shana – Looks like it’s an allergy attack (although to what, I have no idea). In any case, Claritin-D is the stuff of the gods.

  15. November 18, 2008 10:14 pm

    Love the blanket! It’s beautiful!

  16. November 19, 2008 9:55 am

    diaryofaneccentric – Thanks! Warm, too!

  17. November 22, 2008 1:02 pm

    Wow! I’m really impressed by the blanket. The only thing I’ve ever crocheted before is a scarf and the yarn was a horrid color of pink (I like pink, but this was of the pepto variety). How long have you been knitting/crocheting for? Did you teach yourself? Haha–I’m really curious!!

  18. November 22, 2008 2:04 pm

    Trish – I learned to crochet about 6 or 7 years ago – I spent a semester in Central America, and when packing, I was thinking “it’s the tropics, I don’t really need warm clothes,” but it turns out that up in the mountains, it still gets really cold! Anyways, one girl in the course knew how to crochet, so she taught us all so we could make ourselves hats.

    I did teach myself to knit about two years ago, using a book/kit called (oddly enough) I Taught Myself Knitting that I picked up at the local craft store. Mostly I do afghans and scarves – stuff that I don’t have to worry about whether or not it will fit!

  19. November 22, 2008 3:20 pm

    Thanks for the tip on the book! Do you find crocheting or knitting more difficult, or are they just different?

  20. November 22, 2008 3:30 pm

    Trish – I think there’s an equivalent “I Taught Myself Crocheting” kit as well. I don’t think either’s really all that difficult, especially once you’ve practiced enough that it becomes a repetitive motion. Crochet patterns are a little harder for me to read than knitting patterns, and I have a harder time watching TV and crocheting, since I have to look at my work more often – it’s harder to do by touch. Both are pretty easy, though, I think, especially for flat, square stuff like scarves and afghans. :)

  21. November 22, 2008 11:19 pm

    Hmmm–maybe I should trade in my crochet needle for knitting needles. First I need to conquer the sewing machine, though!

  22. November 24, 2008 9:00 am

    Trish – Gah, I don’t think I’ve touched a sewing machine since 7th grade home ec. Kudos to you for trying!

  23. November 24, 2008 12:21 pm

    What a beautiful job you did on that afghan/blanket.
    I love blue!
    tamara

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